Zaandijk (Zaanse Schans) – Aalsmeer (Haarlem included)

Of course we know that we already told you something about the ever so pretty Zaanse Schans. As we were still there on the 22nd this is just a short continuation – to show you the attractiveness of this little part of (equally small) The Netherlands.

Two charming ladies (unpaid volunteers), traditionally dressed. Of course we asked for their permission to be immortalized.

  • View of the opposite site (I)

    The village of Zaandijk is situated opposite the Zaanse Schans. A bit overlooked, undeservedly. There are two possibilities...

  • View of the opposite site (II)

    ...to cross the river: either by bridge or by little ferry. Don’t skip this possibility if you have got some spare time.

Tuesday the 23rd of July was the day we eventually left – after 4 free) nights at Zaandijk – Zaanse Schans. We started the engine at 11:30AM and, after having switched it off at 1:00PM, found ourselves back in Zaandam – next to, also Piper Boats-built, Archangel. That offered the opportunity to make a picture of the two of us. Zaandam was warm, very warm. We used our time mainly to do the necessary shopping and keeping our poor suffering dog as cool as possible. (See the 2nd picture of ‘Jay 03.12.’18 (11)’). Walking the dog on the hot pavement became a sort of torturing the dog. There was a moment that he even refused to walk ahead from a shaded surface onto the same sunlit surface.

After two nights in Zaandam we left on Thursday the 25th at 11:43AM, headed back from where we came and ended up in Koog aan de Zaan after amply 2½ hours of cruising. (Headed back?? Yes, it was our plan to join the Noordzeekanaal as brief as possible because of the supposed strong wash.) The change in climate was still noticeable (= hot) and the terrain next to the mooring-spot was really filthy. Therefore, Koog aan de Zaan was hardly a resounding success. We nevertheless remained at Koog aan de Zaan during two nights (it’s for free, you know).

Saturday the 27th, 9:17AM, departure-time. Less than an hour later we moored in Wormerveer – and stayed there for another two nights again (also for free). It offered the opportunity to put the dog inside the cart on Sunday, cycled over 6 kilometers (almost 4 miles) up and down – so some 12,5 kilometers (over 7,5 miles)- to Assendelft where dog-lovers created a space to run free. We left on Monday the 29th at 9:28AM, planning to cruise the Zaan northward, followed by the Tapsloot and the Nauernascha Vaart. This picture is taken at the corner of the latter two. It’s The Netherlands in optima forma.

While on the Nauernasche Vaart we noticed this do-it-yourself little ferry. Look at the turning devises on the shore as well as the ferry-boat and the system will be completely clear to you.

  • Noordzeekanaal (I)

    Careless us!! We waived the possibility to check whether there were any obstacles with the Nauernasche Vaart, Well, there was one. A bridge under maintenance, causing a blockade for all traffic. So we were forced to turn around, cruise the Nauernasche Vaart, Tapsloot and entire Zaan again, passing Wormerveer, Koog aan de Zaan, Zaandijk...

  • Noordzeekanaal (II)

    ...(Zaanse Schans) and Zaandam for the umpteenth time. Thus we were forced to be on the Noordzeekanaal longer than we planned for, before we could leave it to cruise towards/into Haarlem. The left picture is the front-view we had on the canal, the right picture the rear-view. As you can see, no sea-going vessels, nor ferocious waves.

The Noordzeekanaal is designed for sea-going vessels, sailing from the sea into the port of Amsterdam and vice versa. The canal is divided in sections – each of them with its own VHF channel. A sign tells when to switch. One’s supposed to announce ones presence and to sign out again when leaving the canal.

  • 'De Adriaan'

    After some ‘shots and knocks’ we reached the attractive city of Haarlem at 4:16PM (pffff) and got a harbourmaster’s permission to moor temporarily in front of the windmill ‘De Adriaan’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Adriaan,_Haarlem). Temporarily, because during rush-hour the bridges re-start operating at 6:00PM again. In the background...

  • Het Spaarne

    ...of the left picture a bridge, the Catharijnebrug, is visible. British friends of ours lost a wheelhouse there three years back. (Not their fault.) See https://www.nhnieuws.nl/nieuws/187764/schip-op-spaarne-beschadigd-na-aanvaring-met-catharijnebrug-. Only in Dutch, but the accompanying picture explains it all.

Our final mooring-spot, between the Melkbrug and Langebrug. As a proof that we have been in Haarlem indeed, one of its most famous landmarks, the Sint Bavokerk (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grote_Kerk,_Haarlem) is visible in the background. On the 1st of September 1911, the Dutch aviation pioneer, Anthony Fokker (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Fokker), a Haarlemmer from the age of 4, flew around its tower, to the astonishment of Haarlem’s inhabitants.

  • Rear view (evening light)

    Sometimes the late or early light makes...

  • Front view (morning light)

    ...one grab for the camera immediately.

Even Haarlem eventually must be left behind, though not earlier than after having been there for 5, yes: five, days. And it seems for free, too, as the method of paying is arranged by the AanUit-system, meaning one pays afterwards (credit-card). Anyway, we explored the city, had several visitors and are, of course, planning to be back in the future. Leaving-time on Saturday the 3rd of August was 12:39PM. We stopped inside the Ringvaart van de Haarlemmermeerpolder, near Aalsmeer, at 4:34PM. This is what it looks like where we are.

Saturday the 3rd was the day of the Gay Pride Canal Parade in Amsterdam. During the evening a load of floating devices passed us. This is just one example (‘born to be me’), making a sanitary stop.

Gay Pride Canal Parade

After having relieved themselves (‘don’t look’- we didn’t) they left while playing a typical Dutch tearjerker. (André Hazes jr??) Magic!

  • Busy (I)

    Loads of boats on the canal besides noticeable being...

  • Busy (II)

    ...moored next to Schiphol International Airport.

This two week’s statistics.

Engine ran during 14 hours and 54 minutes (14,9 hours) – Tuesday 23.07 1,4 hours, Thursday 25.07 1,8 hours, Saturday 27.07 0,8 hours, Monday 29.07 6,9 hours, Saturday 03.08 4 hours.

Generator this period:  around 15 hours.

Weather: mostly sunny – sometimes (too) hot.

Hope to see you next week again!