Potsdam - Plaue

  • New balloon-fender

    On Monday the 9th of July 2018, when we just had left for a long-distance (well…) bike-ride, we received a telephone call from Yachthafen Potsdam that our long awaited parcel had arrived. We had ordered on Tuesday the 3rd and were told that it would take four (working-)days on average. So that turned out to be correct.

  • Yachthafen Potsdam


    We immediately turned around and picked up the parcel. We were grateful towards the Yachthafen because they gave us permission to use their address as an address for delivery. A bottle of whine expressed our gratitude. In case you’re interested: http://yachthafen-potsdam.de/yachthafen-potsdam.html.

  • Fischräucherei

    Our bike-ride was resumed after dropping of the parcel at our ship. We biked into a town called Werder, partly because of the ride itself – partly because we wanted to see if there was a sufficient mooring space for us over there next to Fishrestaurant ‘Arielle’. This restaurant offers a mooring-pontoon to their customers. We observed what happened when we where there and the way they check the pontoon-use remains an open question to us.

  • Werder/Arielle

    Anyway, the construction of the pontoon made us doubt whether it is capable of safely holding our heavy ship without wrecking itself. Besides we passed Werder fairly early the next day, in fact too early to stop already. Arielle has a large floating outdoor platform, visible at the second picture just right from the centre, but very good visible at their own website https://wirsindwerder.de/fischrestaurant-arielle/.

After having been in Potsdam for another 8 (free) nights we left on Tuesday the 10th of July at 8:40AM. Werder was passed around 10:00AM, so you can see why we skipped it. Just before we passed Werder there was a notable noise in the air above us, combined with the penetrating sound of clatter. Seconds later we noticed a large flight of cormorants, landing next to us in the wide river Havel. Later on we inspected our ship for marks of droppings, be it liquid or solid. The damage was a lot less than we expected…

A random picture of what’s to be seen on the banks of the river Havel. This, the roof of the church-building we mean, made us think of many such-like roofs we’ve seen in France.

We left the main channel of the river around 11:20AM, to see if there was a place to be found in a side-loop where the town of Ketzin is situated. To our delight there was just one space, on the outside of one of the fixed pontoons of the local boat-club, big enough to accommodate a ship of our size. Consequently we stopped, moored up and switched off the engine at 11:50AM after a fabulous cruise on the splendid river Havel. Because we had been self-supporting for almost three weeks we thought it to be wise to connect to the mains for a night, in view of pampering our much appreciated battery-bank.

  • Ketzin promenade

    Ketzin-town is not all that exciting. They have created, however, a ‘promenade’ alongside the river where a walk under the old trees is a delight. Because the Wednesday was a birthday-day for one of us, we decided to spend two nights in Ketzin...

  • Ketzin restaurant

    ...and have dinner in an Italian restaurant alongside Ketzin’s promenade with a view onto the river. The capacity of the electricity was limited to 5 amps only anyway, so it took some time before the indicator changed from ‘absorption’ to ‘float’.

Ketzin was left behind on Thursday the 12th of July 2018 at 9:44AM. Something completely unusual happened that day. Rain poured down for several hours!! Believe it or not, we loved it – after all those (too) hot days. We have felt being in the south of France, or something similar, for a long period. Not for the first time a white wagtail (witte kwikstaart) accompanied us.

We decided to give it a go and leave our intended route to see if we could stay in a place called Plaue, because we were told that the mooring space there is for free, unlimited, and we are not in a hurry. Lucky us, when we arrived around 2:00PM there were only three house-/holiday-boats moored, about to leave because it was their lunch-break. So here we are, since last Thursday, moored at a comfortable quay. Yippee!!

The last picture shows two bridges, an old and a new one. Only walkers and bikers are allowed to use the old bridge nowadays. A disused tramway is still visible. The surface of the former foot- and/or cycle-path has been removed and, as you can see, the dangerous open surface is extensively fenced off. The old bridge, by the way, dates from 1904, when the Deutsches (Kaiser) Reich (Imperial Germany) still existed.

  • Sunset (I)

    Two examples of the view onto the opposite ban we’ve got from where we are moored. Why...

  • Sunset (II)

    ...should we have any further comment when everyone can see the beauty with one’s own eyes?

  • Daring youngster

    Jumping from the bridge is relatively safe, insofar the bridge itself is ‘conquered’. Think of climbing, unprotected, over the fence and jumping in between the supporting girders of the former surface. The upside down-act looks

  • Agile youngster

    easier, but is in fact pretty difficult to do on a wonky surfboard. He didn’t get wet and even made a picture of one of his friends, using his smartphone! (Never, repeat never, undertake any action without your smartphone at hand.)

  • Fish for sale

    Every Saturday and Sunday this car appears. And do the people know! The fish-selling woman is a very successful one, though the weather was...

  • Fish eating

    ...not against her. We bought salted herring, with onions on rolls. On Saturday only one each, on Sunday two. Are they good? No, they are the best!

That same Saturday, the 14th of July, a ship was moored behind ours, extensively decorated because of a wedding.

Our Dutch neighbour, John from Zaltbommel on ‘Andante’, played his soprano-saxophone spontaneously to enhance the festive atmosphere.

Of course all attention was focused on the happy couple.

As usual, us Samaritans offered a place to a late arriving boat with a bunch of people -and a dog- desperately seeking for an overnight mooring-possibility.

  • Barn swallows

    Of course we have seen barn swallows (boerenzwaluw) before. But never as close as we did in Ketzin last week. Aren’t they cute? Since we are in the east of Germany we’ve seen hooded crows (bonte...

  • Hooded crows

    ...kraai) on many an occasion. We had never seen (noticed?) them before in Western Europe. Only carrion crows (zwarte kraai). Well, two breeds of bird that captured our attention lately to end with. Bye bye.