Sanssouci & Holländisches Viertel

We’ve been in Potsdam from the 21st for one full week. Potsdam offers several interesting places to go, so we decided to create an ‘own’ page to this charming city. This time we restrict ourselves to the Sanssouci palace and park and the Holländisches Viertel (Dutch Quarter). This picture shows the entrance we used to enter the Sanssouci park. Later on we realised that this one is less glorious than the main entrance.

A random picture of the park, just to show how peaceful and pretty it is.

  • Chinesisches Haus


    The first ‘unable-to-overlook’ item we saw was the Chinesisches Haus

  • Cupola crowning

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_House_(Potsdam)). The Wikipedia-page is a very interesting read!

The drive-way, leading to the Sanssouci-palace starts with beautiful statues on either side. This is the one on the right side when walking towards the palace. A lioness/mother protecting her children.

Sanssouci palace in its full glory. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanssouci. This will give you all the information you’d want – far more than we are able to think of. Built by Friedrich II. or Friedrich der Große (1712 – 1786).

One of the statues surrounding the large fountain in front of the palace. A bathing woman cleaning her right foot using a sponge while her dog rests in peace at her other foot. All statues are utterly amazing.

Climbing Sanssouci’s stairs, revealing the details of the vast number of grapes in front of the palace. Inside the doors another variety of a plant was thriving. We have no idea what kind of plant, nor why all doors were in an open position.

The impressive front of the palace in detail.

The view down from Sanssouci’s stairs.

While one of us climbed the stairs for making pictures, the other one sat down, read something and relaxed.

The large fountain in front of the palace. We’re looking here to the west, towards the Neues Palais (New Palace).

When on the way to the Neues Palais we stopped to have a look, from a distance, to the Orangerieschloss (Orangery Palace). Again we strongly advise to read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orangery_Palace.

This statue (possibly Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795 – 1861)) in front of the Orangerieschloss could use some cleaning. Now we’re mentioning Friedrich Wilhelm IV: read about him https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Wilhelm_IV. Yes, in German!

Here’s the prove that we visited the Sanssouci-park by using our folding bikes. Approaching the Neues Palais.

Another palace in its full glory, being the Neues Palais, also built by Friedrich Wilhelm IV. What else can one say than just: wow!

The gilded statue on top of the Neues Palais. It is supposed to represent the three graces, though we overheard a(n American) guide argue that it symbolizes Prussia’s three most dangerous enemies, being Austria, France and Russia. If not true, it’s a nice enough thought!

We had a rest, sitting on a bench, in front of the Neues Palais. A sensational view, combined with peaceful quietness.

Only when leaving Sanssouci park we realized how 100% kingly the main entrance is. There’s more inside this park than in this blog-page. Perhaps on another occasion…

Being of Dutch nationality we are, of course, supposed to visit the Holländisches Viertel (Dutch Quarter, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Quarter, much better in German). This is what that looks like – the Mittelstraße. It does look familiar indeed, even more reddish than it does in The Netherlands! Bricks are our thing, though.

  • A Dutch café in Potsdam

    Pannekoeken At the corner of the Mittel- and Benkertstraße we even noticed a Holländisches Café. Via their sign-board the exploiter promises ‘Poffertjes en Pannekoeken’ (Poffertjes -no translation, a sort of mini fluffy pancakes- and Pancakes).

  • Poffertjes & Pannekoeken

    We did not enter (our diet, you know), but of course appreciates this generously. Pannekoeken, by the way, is the former way of spelling. Some wise men decided that it now should be panneNkoeken. We prefer the old way of spelling, by the way. That’s it for now.